Santa Severa’s Castle is one of the most evocative places of the Lazio region, located along the Tyrrhenian coast in the north of Rome, is a heritage of inestimable value both historical and cultural. The Castle owes its current name to the young Christian martyr Severa, who was killed – traditionally – on June 5, 298 AD in this place, together with his brothers Calendino and Marco, under the empire of Diocletian.

view of the Castle of Santa Severa. Today it is also seat to the Museum of the Sea and Ancient Navigation. Lazio Region, Central Italy

The Castle, with its current rectangular-shaped structure and enriched with corner towers is in the XIV century. The Manor, through a bridge, is joined by the Fortress to the imposing Saracen Tower, an ancient cylindrical fortification, formerly called “the Tower of the Castle”, built in the mid-ninth century by Pope Leo IV and, following continuous renovations, has come to us in its last structure, dated between the XVI and XVII centuries.

The first written documentation of the castle dates back to 1068, when Gerardo di Galeria – a Count of Norman origin – donated the Castle and the Church to the Abbey of Farfa that in 1130, under Pope Anacletus II, gave it to the confreres of St. Paul. In 1482 Pope Sixtus IV donated it to the Order of the Holy Spirit, who owned it for five hundred years, until 1980.

view of the Castle of Santa Severa. Today it is also seat to the Museum of the Sea and Ancient Navigation. Lazio Region, Central Italy

It was during this period, under the aegis of Santo Spirito, that the village came to life (between the XV and XVI centuries) and in the entire place, the typical coat of arms of the Order is visible: the patriarchal cross. After a long period of decline, the Germans also used the Castle as a strategic base during the Second World War.

website: www.castellodisantasevera.it